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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 2, 2017 3:05am-4:01am EST

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i mean, listen, odb, he has to start -- he has to stop looking like tar is an playing like jane. he's looking like tar is an, he walks on the field. once the game starts, it's like when the guy disappears, he missed ez pass today. it's happened way then move on to matthews. good player, not a number one receiver. i think he'd be a much better number two. i think it would make him a player that is more of an impact, if he were. i believe that. saar saar i hated the media. they knew nothing what they were talking about. but agholor, what -- my thing is, you got -- i mean, he's been
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catching balls his whole life then now he can't catch it in the winter. i don't understand it. then i move on to the o line, i think they would be better. they will be better with lane johnson. then the corners. the corners were awful this season. you know, i don't think they playing the ball well. they don't -- bad technique. i'm not going to say -- my thing is they don't play very good technique ball. and they don't have a shutdown corner. in this league, every team needs the number one shutdown corner, every team has great number one receiver. i don't think you can name a team, in the nfl that doesn't have great number one receiver, other than the eagles. eagles the only team that doesn't have a great number one receiver. you have to have that corner back in can shut down and then a
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great nickel back. would have either at this point in time. the corners have been not good. then i moved on, talked about shim schwartz. he's over simplistic. needs to throw them a little bit more wrinkles. when i was here in philadelphia, we had jim johnson, the play book was that thick, the chicago bears was that thick. it was a whole different ballgame and i think with more blitzes more kind of complex parts of the defense, i'm not saying, exactly keep people honest. you're playing a basic cover, you got to be better. great quarterbacks bike aaron rogers and tom brady where you have to disguise it or they will eat you alive >> darren walker, thank four joining us all season long >> it's a bitter sweet moment i
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won't be here anymore this season >> usually don bell would be here to break down the game but done got the job of going to pasadena. >> penn state playing in the rose ball since 2009 when paterno was head coach, the southern california sun peaking through the clouds. and thousands. hoping to add more championship hardware >> this team has a lot of grit, young talented team, that's something you're born with, you can't teach that. >> this guy decided to dye his hair >> everything loves it. it's just great. my wife wasn't thrilled when i
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got home >> that's to be expected. >> penn state had its first title since 2008 definitely worth a family trip cross country >> we're is a season ticket holders, we wouldn't miss this for the world, something we've been looking forward to. it's the culmination, >> cheerleaders the marching band, palm trees, only one thing missing, a, rosebowl championship >> we're going to use the second half game plan in the first half >> fans sound a little overconfident. the last time we saw this penn state team they were overcoming a at one point deficit in the big championship against wisconsin. that was a record. with the nittany lions i'm don
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bell. here in the hyundai sports zone we'll check in in the vikings. . >> the flyers opened the new year in anaheim,
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soreness games on thursday and friday, rodriguez missed friday with a sprained left ankle. jared bail list out. . the flyers kicking off 202017 in anaheim going into the game. lost five of six. a win, of course, would be nice. first fight of the year for wayne simmons, suffer as bit of
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a wardrobe malfunction. top less on the west coast. ducks up two-1 to start the second. kessler makes it three. they throw the hats out there in anaheim. flyers come roaring back. braden schenn scores and ties the game. flyers put up 55 shots the game to overtime and the shoot-out that that's jake vorachek with the back hand that keeps the flyers alive. shawn couturier no dice with a loss. the eagles pick goes to the brown while the birds will get the minnesota vikings first round choice acquired in the sam bradford deal. how did the vikings do? let's go around the nfl. sam bradford with a record breaking performance, seriously.
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bradford with solid day. 250 yards and three touchdowns. he sets the nfl record for highest completion percentage ever. 71.6. the vikings beat the bears 38-10. eagles will get the 14th or 15th in the draft depends on a coin flip at the combine. the jets and the bills. we show you because of how bad this play is fourth quarter jets kicking off. nobody touches it. they just stand, there that's a live baum. doug middletown recovers it. at least the eagles aren't the bills or the jets if that makes you feel better. 30-10. stefanie stahl is in the einstein healthcare science center with more on the problem and solutions.
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>> reporter: kids love sports. science is showing many. >>s are realed to overuse. tennis players can end up with a lot of the shoulder and elbow injuries, any sport where same body sport is used over and over again can be a problem. >> that's leading to increased. >>. in a form native. >> overspecialization, kids doing one sport can be dangerous >> in soccer we see a lot of hamstring injuries. increase in concussions. there's also stress related set. >> a lot of coaches and parents like to have the kids specialize in one sport. they want them to concentrate one sport >> former eagles said while he
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focused on football he did different sports and thinks it's especially important for kid >> i think it helps to play multiple sports, makes you a better athlete. >> reporter: if children are specialize in one sport should be limited to eight months and weekly training hour should be calculated around a child's age >> eight years old shouldn't be training more than eight hours a week. >> reporter: the science shows if children are injured they should wait until completely recovered before returning to the sports. i'm stefanie stahl cbs3 "eyewitness news." >> our final time out. when we return it's the top three place on of the year. top three on 3 next.
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. time of week and year. the top three on 3 plays of 2016. ♪
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we hope you enjoyed your time in the zone. all of the people that make our
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shows happen, happy new year everyone.
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we close in italy where thieves have been targeting precious parmesan cheese. we are talking serious cheddar. millions of dollars worth. seth doane is on the case with the parmesan patrol. >> these patrols happen every night. >> every night. >> reporter: in 30 years, he has never seen a wave of robberies like this. police blame organized crime, no surprise there, the targets? >> this cheese can be quite valuable. >> yes, cheese. these are the streets of italy, home to parmesan. >> pretty much -- >> reporter: there have been so many thefts, he explains, cheese like gold here.
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the price is so high. exhibit a. a single wheel of cheese can sell for over $500. the staple of spaghetti dinners everywhere is the economic backbone of these small italian towns. parmesan is so valuable that it is used as collateral for loans. believe it or not. this is a bank. its vault filled with more than $120 million worth of cheese. to be certified parmesan, it must age for at least a year. so that means, cheese, a whole lot is stacked in warehouses on small rural, unprotected farms. lorenzo panetti showed us how thieves made off with $100,000 of his cheese in minutes. >> make an assembly line. steal this piece and this piece. the parmesan consortium figures $7 million has been stolen in the last two years.
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there is a robust black market. so, stepped up patrols and new security systems are now in place. >> surely this will not be the last time thieves come to visit us, panetti said. small independent farmers are what makes this cheese so good and such a delicious target. seth doane, cbs news, italy. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new
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york city, i'm elaine quijano. >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." with the holidays behind us and the new year upon us, the shift to the next big date on the calendar. president inaugurtion of donald trump. john dickerson looked ahead at the year in politics with a panel of journalists and editors and discussed the impact of the incoming president and challenges facing the country. >> journalist michele norris, heads up race card project and aspen institute. jeffrey goldberg, editor-in-chief of the atlantic, mike cam gersen, columnist for "the washington post" and david from, senior editor at atlantic.
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jeffrey, all take the assignment, start with you. >> what did i do wrong? >> in the new year we want to target you with this question. which is you are an assignment editor. you have to assign coverage for the year 2017. how do you deploy your forces? what's the story? >> the story is there is one overarchingly huge story. a very bigly story as michelle might say. the, the story its -- the story is the up ending of american politics. the story is of the outs coming in. the ins going out. the story is, trying to explain to the american people what has happened to their two main
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parties. and, the deeper story, also, i don't want to forget this, the deeper story is globalization and technological disruption and anxiety born of rapid change, rapid destablizing change. the fragility of institutions. all of that is there. under the larger more immediate story which is how did donald trump become president of the united states? and what does it mean for not only the way america understands itself but the way the world understands america. i would just add one more point. which is that-- the rest of the world is watching with baded breath. because we, we are at a, hinge moment in history. since 1945, we have played a certain role in the world. it's not entirely clear that, after january 20th. we are going to play that same role. >> should make you an editor. michelle, what is your -- >> i think it is interesting end of the year. miriam webster told us they chose the word surreal as the word of the year for 2016. because the it describes so much of what we are seeing right now. i want to pick up on one of the things jeffrey said. about the technological disruption in the country we
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have assumed technology was a good thing. we embraced it. assumed it was propelling us forward. and that it would, perhaps, even though it was displaying jobs would make for a better society, better flow of information. i think we will question that on a lot of levels, because the of what it has done to democracy, certainly what it has done to the level of american discourse. as journalists we have to learn how to operate in a world where there is no longer a common set of facts. people -- get their news in such a way that it usually affirms or confirms everything that they already believe. we have some one who is about to occupy the oval office, who its -- dismissing many of the publications that we work or have worked for. is trying to bypass us and go to people. as we try to explain the surreal university. we find ourselves in, all most a, a room of fun house mirrors. trying to figure how to describe what is going on.
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>> david? >> neo-fascist party may win the presidency of france this year. democratic institutions in the country liberated are falling apart in hungary, poland, croatia. the united states has a new president to be who has made it clear he is not going to be bound by traditional rules against corruption, against foreign influence, traditional rules against the president having his own private bodyguard, paid for by himself rather than by the state. we are living through a crisis of democracy, not, unlike anything seen since the second world war. that's the story. not an american story. global story. a story of american nonexceptionalism. and, because what is going on in the united states is happening elsewhere.
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story of globalization coming home. because it is, americans are used to as the world's strongest power being the country that influences other. the idea a foreign power reached into the united states and tampered with american democracy. and maybe chosen for americans a president that larger numbers of americans didn't want for themselves. >> russia in this case. >> an experience, weaker countries, smaller countries have had. americans since the greatness of the country have arrived have never had to worry. that has the happened. it is going to be a ver dif result year. a year that is difficult because of what is happening and because it is not in our nature to think about it. one more thing. i have the experience again and again. many of you -- may have it too. of being in a coffee shop.
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some one i know well come up say hello. tell me that everything is going to be okay? what i realize is, i can't give you the assurance you want. i am not sure that everything is going to be okay. here's what i do know. the only way that things will be okay if is we all understand how not okay they are. if we are sufficiently enflamed. we may be able to put the fire out. >> michael? >> well i think there is a, pretty much even chance that we are going to have a constitutional crisis or have a completely incompetent presidency doesn't know how to exercise power. another possibility in this circumstance. a white house, donald trump has a white house with almost no skill at governing. a chief of staff that has never been in government. which is absolutely extraordinary. he has elevated people, generals and, and corporate head, that have no experience in this extraordinarily complex business of how you put together an administration. run a bureaucracy. produce ideas. so, there is -- i think there is a deep concern about the possibility of overreach. but i think we should also be concerned about possibility of an entirely ineffective government that doesn't value governing experience. that doesn't value, you know, what government should do. and what it can do under the right circumstances. >> that side of the table is
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very depressing. i mean, i mean, don't you have any hope at all that america is somehow resilient, institutions will overcome whatever temporary challenges. sorry, i just, i just, struck by it. >> if the idea is that the structures of democracy, where do you think the -- >> fully agree with michelle. that technology. social media. these pose unique challenge the way we communicate and organize democracy. we have been in business for a long time in the country. we have survived worse things than whatever we are facing at the moment. i am just. keep, you know, keep hope alive. i don't know what the, feeling is. >> i am hopeful americans will rise to the challenge. the message they do not need to hear is don't worry your grandparents rose to the challenge. therefore you can stay on the couch. because, you face -- >> think you can tell them that. there are past examples of bravery, forted to. >> your grandparents survived this and you will too if you don't stay on the couch. >> need to take the measure of the threat to democratic institutions in the country around the world. >> to watch more go to cbsnews.com.
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click on face the nation we'll be right back.
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2016 was quite a year. both at home and abroad. bill whitaker take is a look back at momentous events. month by month. >> reporter: in january, michigan declared a state of emergency in the city of flint. following the detection of elevated levels of lead in children. a switch in the city's water supply caused lead to leach from old pipes. >> february saw the death of supreme court justice ant anyone scalia at age 79. >> i'm nominating chief judge. >> republican controlled senate decleaned to act -- declined to act on president obama's nomination. in march.
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isis claimed responsibility for back to back bombings at the brussels airport and subway that killed 32 people. on april 21st, queen elizabeth marked her 90th birthday. although the full-scale public celebration wasn't held until june. in may, nasa announced its kepler space telescope discovered 1284 new planets in distant solar systems. that brings the number of discovered plan tights more than 3,200. june saw the mass shooting at pulse nightclub in orlando. >> out of nowhere. no one can tell me where my son is. >> gunman omar matin shot and killed 49 people and wounded 53 others before dying in a shootout with police. in july, a hot air balloon caught fire after hitting power lines and crashed in texas. killing all 16 people on board. >> it is really hot today.
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this past august, checked in as the the hottest august on record. the national oceanic, and atmospheric administration said the worldwide temperature was 1 and 2/3 fahrenheit higher than 20th century average. >> we are extremely fortunate and grateful no one was killed. >> in september, a bomb exploded on a busy new york city street. injuring 29 people. suspect ahmad khan ramami was arrested after a shootout with police in new jersey. >> reporter: in october, hurricane matthew struck the southeastern coast from florida to north carolina. forcing an estimated 2 million evacuations. and killing at least 26 people. november brought donald trump's defeat of hillary clinton in the presidential election. he won a clear victory in the electoral college, while losing the popular vote by almost 2.9 million votes.
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sunday morning paid tribute to the big names we lost in 2016. here's jane pauley. ♪ dearly beloved ♪ we are gathered here today to get through this thing called life ♪ ♪ and if the elevator tries to bring you down go crazy ♪ ♪ >> reporter: like a preacher to his flock, prince spread a gospel of music. bursting with love, funk and soul. ♪ so tonight i'm going to party like it's 1999 ♪ ♪ only want to see you i only want to see you purple rain ♪ >> reporter: he was a self-taught virtuoso who wrote countless songs. ♪ little red corvette >> you know these are like my children.
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and they -- will be all that will be left upon my departing of this experience. ♪ i just want your extra time and your ♪ >> reporter: in his life he maintained an aura of mystery. and at 57, he left us this past year. he left us wanting more. >> you never really understand a person until you kid things from his point of view. >> to climb inside of his skin. >> reporter: and walk around in it. and "to kill a mockingbird" by author harper lee, the novel won the pulitzer prize in 1960, the movie adaptation, starring gregory peck, a film classing to this day. a lot of us walked around in the skin of lee's characters who lived in a fictional southern town that really could have been anywhere.
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>> always thought, tell the story of the south, tell the history of the world. >> reporter: author pat conroy left us in 2016. among his novels, "the prince of tides" and the great santini" both about families. >> always think literature is much better when there is a love/hate relationship. >> other parents aren't lying, they believe in their children. >> no, they don't. >> as an overly involved parent, on "everybody loves raymond" everybody loved emmy winning mom doris roberts. ♪ mama ♪ ♪ ♪ that leaves only me to blame >> reporter: merle haggard sang about his mother. but he was no mama's little angel. >> the more i want to jail the more i learned about being -- an outlaw. >> reporter: convicted for burglary as a young man, haggard
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spent time in san kwenton. ♪ i'm proud to be an oaky >> then mined his life story for his songs. and became a legend. >> reporter: some other music giants left us during the year. ♪ you wonder why the earth still moves, you wonder how you carry on ♪ ♪ but you'll be okay ♪ on that first day ♪ when i'm gone ♪ i'd look to teach the world to sing sing with me in perfect harmony perfect harmony ♪ ♪ buy the world a coke and keep it company ♪
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♪ that's the real thing >> ad man, bill backer, he was the real thing. he wrote jingles for coca-cola, tag lines for campbell soup. ♪ soup is good food >> reporter: and remember this one? >> if you've got the time we've got the beer ♪ ♪ two all beef batties special sauce pickles onions on a sesame seed bun. >> he didn't write the single for the big mac. he cooked up the recipe. billions served since. raymond tomlinson he knew where it is at, he put the@ sign in our e-mail addresses. in countless photographs, bill cunningham turned the people of new york into trend setting models. >> this fashion show is definitely on the street. always has been. always will be. >> reporter: but it was on catwalks where designer james gallanos showed his style.
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>> times change. people change. looks change. but, good taste is the most important thing. >> the president of the united states and mrs. reagan. >> it may be that no one wore gallanos better than this woman. first lady nancy reagan. she left us this past year. she was known for being president reagan's closest adviser. >> i think there is always a certain jealousy that's the word you want to use of the one who is closest to the president. and obviously the one who is closest is his wife or should be. i hope. >> reporter: after the president's diagnosis with alzheimers, mrs. reagan became an important supporter of stem cell research. >> i just don't see how we can
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turn our backs on this. >> reporter: a stance at odds with some of her fellow republicans. >> i think the pro-lifers are the vitality, the enthusiasm, and the heart and soul of the republican party. >> reporter: conservative phyllis schaffley battled fiercely for her causes. >> i attack idea. i don't attack people. some very good people have some very bad ideas. and if you can't separate the two, you got to get a day job. >> supreme court justice antonin scalia, a vibrant conservative voice. >> i can be charming and combative at the same time. what's contradictory between the two. i love to argue. well may be i am something of a shin kicker. >> a fighter who could be engagingly warm as a colleague and friend. >> those who tried to put us in jail have gone to prison themselves while we are still here. activist tom hayden fault for the other side.
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he was a leader of the civil rights and anti-war movements of the 1960s. >> this is the beginning of the end. this is the beginning of the climax of the war in southeast asia. >> fidel castro at age 32. you now have in your hand ape great deal of power and deal of responsibility. >> fidel castro, leader of the cuban resistance in the 1950s who became a dictator in the 60s and who would live to haunt 11 u.s. presidents. viva la revolucion! >> reporter: some admired him. others feared and even fled him. >> it is time for this little boy who has been through so much, to beep with his father. >> reporter: then attorney general, janet reno who made the controversial decision to send one young refugee, elian
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gonzalez back to cuba. >> general reno, congratulations. >> our first woman, attorney general and served while grappling with parkinson's. through it all, janet reno never compromised her ideals. >> i'm the king of the world! i'm pretty. >> hold it. you are not that pretty. >> nor did mohammad ali. a three time world heavyweight boxing champion. born casius clay, he changed his name. >> casius clay no more? >> yes, sir. mohammad ali, mohammad. worthy of all praises. a lichlt. most high. >> he became a polarizing figure for religious beliefs and refusal to fight in the vietnam war. >> whatever suffering, punishment i have to take the
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all because of my religion.
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trulia. the house is only half of it. we close in italy where thieves have been targeting precious parmesan cheese. we are talking serious cheddar. millions of dollars worth. seth doane is on the case with the parmesan patrol. 9:30 a.m., police officers keep watch from a convoy. >> these patrols happen every night. >> every night. >> reporter: in 30 years, he has never seen a wave of robberies like this. police blame organized crime, no surprise there, the targets? >> this cheese can be quite valuable.
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>> yes, cheese. these are the streets of italy, home to parmesan. >> pretty much -- >> reporter: there have been so many thefts, he explains, cheese like gold here. the price is so high. exhibit a. a single wheel of cheese can sell for over $500. the staple of spaghetti dinners everywhere is the economic backbone of these small italian towns. parmesan is so valuable that it is used as collateral for loans. believe it or not. this is a bank. its vault filled with more than $120 million worth of cheese. to be certified parmesan, it must age for at least a year. so that means, cheese, a whole lot is stacked in warehouses on small rural, unprotected farms. lorenzo panetti showed us how thieves made off with $100,000 of his cheese in minutes. >> make an assembly line. steal this piece and this piece. the parmesan consortium figures $7 million has been stolen in
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the last two years. there is a robust black market. so, stepped up patrols and new security systems are now in place. >> surely this will not be the last time thieves come to visit us, panetti said. small independent farmers are what makes this cheese so good and such a delicious target. seth doane, cbs news, italy. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, january 2nd, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." the hunt is on for the killer who slaughtered at least 39 people at a nightclub in turkey. >> i also know thing that other people don't know, so they cannot be sure of the situation. >> president-elect trump is promising a revelation about the russia/u.s. presidential election hacking scandal. mariah carey's new year's eve ends with a performance

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